Last edited by Molabar
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

5 edition of A history of Florida citrus freezes found in the catalog.

A history of Florida citrus freezes

by John A. Attaway

  • 238 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Florida Science Source in Lake Alfred, FL .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Florida
    • Subjects:
    • Citrus -- Effect of freezes on -- Florida -- History.,
    • Freezes (Meteorology) -- Florida -- History.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 347-354) and index.

      StatementJohn A. Attaway.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsSB369.2.F6 A88 1997
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxv, 368 p. :
      Number of Pages368
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL660657M
      ISBN 100944961037
      LC Control Number97006049
      OCLC/WorldCa36543319

      Freezes. The one word nobody in the citrus industry wants to hear, yet freezes throughout the century have played a huge role in the history of Florida citrus. The first orange groves were planted in St. Augustine around Severe freezes in and forced growers to head south, where Central Florida would become. Fabulous writing that documents the history of the orange and the impact of the citrus industry on Florida up to the s, when this book was compiled from a /5().

        The purpose of the fourth edition of the Florida Citrus Rootstock Selection Guide is to provide timely and useful citrus rootstock information to help Florida citrus growers make well-grounded, practical decisions. New problems with abiotic factors, pests and diseases make the guide a standard document for the Florida citrus industry.   A second major hard freeze this month iced up oranges and other fruit across Florida's citrus growing regions, causing some fruit damage and raising fears of longer-term impact on groves, growers.

        The first severe cold weather event of Florida's Great Freeze swept over the state on Decem By midnight, Decem , the devastating impacts were being felt. The history of Citrus County Florida. The first humans arrived in Florida ab years ago. They found a land that extended far out into the Gulf of Mexico. The present Citrus County shore line was at that time almost feet above sea level. Very little is known about these early nomadic people. The Crystal River State Archaeological Site gives us the first glimpse at the .


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A history of Florida citrus freezes by John A. Attaway Download PDF EPUB FB2

A History of Florida Citrus Freezes Hardcover – June 1, by John A. Attaway (Author) › Visit Amazon's John A. Attaway Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author.

Cited by: A history of Florida citrus freezes by John A. Attaway,Florida Science Source edition, in EnglishPages: Get this from a library. A history of Florida citrus freezes. [John A Attaway] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help.

Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for History: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: John A Attaway. Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC Number: Immediately after, Florida experienced a month of warm weather, which made citrus more vulnerable for the second freeze on FebruaryThe freeze on February was one of the most severe in the history of the state and was a *near-impact freeze.

Having lived through the last 50 years of these freezes, and being a student of them, Dr. Attaway has written a reliable, remarkable, and poingant account of these devasating events.

I'm sorry that I am the first and only reviewer of this magnificent account of a piece of Florida history.5/5. The one word nobody in the citrus industry wants to hear, yet freezes throughout the century have played a huge role in the history of Florida citrus.

The first orange groves were planted in St. Augustine around Severe freezes in and forced growers to head south, where Central Florida would become the hub of the citrus industry. The freezes damaged the Florida citrus industry so much it took decades for it to recover.

Other historic freezes have come and gone in. Florida’s citrus production had been five million boxes per year, but it took two decades of recovery before that production level was achieved again (Florida Memory Blog). In the temperature plummeted 60 degrees from 78 to 18 degrees, and the following year a four-day freeze between February 13 and February 16 again killed off many.

'The movement down south never got anywhere as big until the л89 freeze,' said John Attaway, author of 'A History of Florida Citrus Freezes,' the definitive book on the subject. 'So many. The history of Florida can be traced to when the first Native Americans began to inhabit the peninsula as early as 14, years ago.

They left behind artifacts and archeological evidence. Florida's written history begins with the arrival of Europeans; the Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de León in made the first textual records. The state received its name from that.

1 day ago  In a saga that spans a century from tomembers of Smith’s fictional MacIvey family face hurricanes, citrus freezes, alligators, rattlesnakes, ravaging bands of Confederate deserters.

Citrus and Oranges originated in Asia but have a rich history in Florida. Juan Ponce de Leon planted the first trees in St. Augustine between and In Brevard County, Douglas Dummit established the Indian River Citrus industry on Merritt Island in the s.

Inside the exhibit: Answer citrus trivia questions and sort oranges. Read a letter from the infamous 'freeze'. ON CITRUS PARSONS Freeze Forecast I n his book A History of Florida Citrus Freezes, Dr.

John Attaway discusses the major freezes that impacted Florida. These freezes occurred in, –,, and While freezes sometimes seemed to occur in clusters and did not occur. InFlorida’s citrus growers harvested the first crop to exceed million boxes of fruit. Although Florida’s citrus industry has encountered more freezing temperatures during the 20th century, the industry has continued to thrive as new groves are planted farther south after each freeze.

Florida at first dominated citrus production in the United States, but because of some devastating freezes in andSatsuma orange trees were virtually wiped out in the Gulf States. Thousands of acres of Satsuma orange trees were wiped out in Alabama, Texas, and Louisiana in the hard freeze of ; thus the citrus production of the.

The link between cold air outbreaks and damage to citrus groves has been well documented throughout Florida's history, most notably after the five devastating freezes of. Freezes in the s destroyed a great many trees, and owners had to battle canker, bugs and other scourges.

North Florida grove owners told of the terrible sound of the orange boughs snapping in the bitter cold hard freezes in the s, which devastated the North Florida citrus industry and made South and Central Florida more attractive. Discover the story behind Deland’s eccentric “citrus wizard” Lue Gim Gong, the rise and fall of smuggler Jesse Fish and the silver-tongued politician William J.

Howey, who made his fortune selling plots of groveland through the s. Celebrate the heyday of orange tourism and the farmers who weathered freezes, floods and citrus greening.

Florida Citrus Commission, for 26 years as its director of. research. He is a world-acknowledged authority on citrus.

cultivation. He is the author of a new book, A History of. Florida Citrus Freezes (Florida Science Source, Inc., $38). It's not a book. Buy The Book. The Florida Citrus Hall of Fame is pleased to announce the availability of a page book filled with over images of Florida citrus crate labels from the collections of Jerry Chicone, Jr.

and Jim Ellis, as well as various photos, ads and postcards depicting images of fresh citrus production in the early years. The Great Freeze is the back-to-back freezes of – in Florida, where the brutally cold weather destroyed much of the citrus crop.

It may also have been responsible for wiping out natural stands of Royal Palm (Roystonea regia) trees from the lower St. Johns River Valley northeast of communities, such as Earnestville, faded after the citrus crops .In andfreezes destroyed much of Florida’s citrus crops.

Not to be defeated, many citrus growers moved south and began growing again. The industry rallied within 15 years and bymore than million boxes of citrus were picked. That number reached million in. Doyle Conner, the Florida Secretary of Agriculture, said that when the losses are totaled, this week's freeze ''may cause as much or more damage to Florida's citrus and vegetable industries'' as.